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Jon Krawczynski / Associated Press, Published September 17 2013

Gophers' Kill not talking about latest seizure

MINNEAPOLIS – Jerry Kill has worked hard to embrace his epilepsy, becoming an outspoken advocate for research of the condition that can include seizures without a moment’s notice.

Now that the season is in full swing, Kill is trying to keep the focus on his team – even after another seizure caused him to miss the second half of a victory over Western Illinois on Saturday. Kill declined to speak directly about his health at his weekly news conference on Tuesday, trying to turn the page and get his team prepared for San Jose State this weekend.

“I’ve done talked about all those other things enough,” Kill said. “This game’s not about a head football coach. This game is about the players and that’s how we’ll approach it today.”

Kill suffered his fourth game-day seizure in three seasons during halftime of the game against Western Illinois. It was the third time he hasn’t been able to finish a game because of it.

While the seizures can be shocking and unsettling to witness in person, it appears the Gophers have steadily adapted to their coach’s situation. They are no longer fazed by hearing that their coach is on his way to the hospital and no longer distracted when they look over to the sideline and Kill is nowhere to be found.

“We’re used to the routine, as bad as that sounds,” defensive back Brock Vereen said. “There’s a sense of confidence in our staff and knowing that as bad as it may look sometimes, he’s going to be fine.”

The Gophers were able to steel themselves on Saturday and respond against an overmatched opponent, turning a tight game into a runaway in the second half as they cruised to a 29-12 victory. As they have before, Kill’s long-time assistants stepped into bigger roles and made the transition so seamless that some players weren’t even aware that Kill wasn’t around.

“That’s not to take away what coach Kill does with us,” Vereen said. “But these coaches have been with coach for a while. We’ve been with coach for a while. If you were in there at halftime, you would never know there was an issue going on.”