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Published July 18 2013

Farm digest - 07/19/13

USDA extends acreage reporting deadline to Aug. 2

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency has announced an extension of the FSA acreage reporting deadline.

Farmers and landowners have an additional 18 calendar days to submit their annual report of acreage to their local FSA county office with the deadline extended to Aug. 2.

The acreage reporting requirement for crop insurance did not change.

Accurate acreage reports are necessary to determine and maintain eligibility for various programs, such as the Direct and Counter-cyclical Program, the Average Crop Revenue Election Program, the Conservation Reserve Program and the Non-insured Crop Disaster Assistant Program.

Producers should contact their county FSA office if they are uncertain about reporting deadlines.

Producers also should visit their USDA Service Center to complete acreage reporting for FSA. For questions on this or any FSA program, producers should contact their FSA county office or seek information online at www.fsa.usda.gov.

‘Working With Wool’ workshop set in Jamestown

If you’ve wondered how the wool sheared from sheep turns into the sweater or scarf you wear, you’ll have a chance to see how it’s done at a workshop Aug. 2 in Jamestown.

The “Working With Wool” workshop is from 9 a.m. to noon at the Stutsman County Fairgrounds. The North Dakota State University Extension Service and North Dakota Lamb and Wool Producers Association are sponsoring the event.

Participants will learn about:

“Hand-spinners will be there to show how yarn is made, and weavers will show how the different cloth structures are made and their applications,” says Julie Mangnall of Stirum, one of the workshop’s organizers.

The workshop is designed for wool producers and anyone interested in wearing natural fibers.

This workshop also is for those who want to learn more about environmentally friendly uses for wool, such as fertilizer, material for cleaning up oil or other fuel spills, and landscaping projects, she notes.

The workshop is one of several events scheduled during the North Dakota Lamb and Wool Expo set for Aug. 2-3 at the Stutsman County Fairgrounds. Other workshops are on cooking with lamb, training a stock dog and alternative sheep grazing systems. All of them are from 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 2.

Participants also will be able to attend presentations on lamb fabrication, lamb quality characteristics, the U.S. lamb market, flock health management and the future of the sheep industry. Those presentations will be during the afternoon and evening of Aug. 2.

Other expo activities include a lamb dinner on Aug. 2 and a lamb lunch on Aug. 3, a ram consignor sheep show and Jamestown ram and ewe sale on Aug. 3, sheep shearing and wool handling demonstrations on Aug. 2, and a vendor fair both days.

The cost of the workshops is $25 per person. The cost for the afternoon and evening presentations on Aug. 2 also is $25 per person. Full registration (both days) if registering by July 26 is $45 per adult plus $25 for each additional adult family member and $10 for each child ages 5 to 17. The expo is free for children under age 5.

For more information, contact Reid Redden, NDSU Extension sheep specialist, at (701) 231-5597 or reid.redden@ndsu.edu. To register, visit the NDSU Animal Sciences Department website at www.ag.ndsu.edu/ansc/.

Irrigation tour scheduled for July 23 in Oakes area

The North Dakota Water Education Foundation is sponsoring the “Irrigation in Motion” tour on Tuesday.

Southeastern North Dakota has extensive irrigation development with about 85,000 acres irrigated and the potential for more. The tour will focus around irrigation activities in the Oakes area and will start with a tour and discussion of research at the Oakes Field Trials, which have provided research data to area producers for at least 50 years.

A reliable water supply is needed for future development, and one new way to provide this is by constructing horizontal wells, a new innovation in the area. Several of these wells have been constructed in this area, which will be viewed and discussed.

Facilities of the Oakes Test Area, a 5,000-acre irrigation development, will be visited, along with irrigation of high-value crops in the area.

The tour will begin and end in Jamestown, but tour participants from the Oakes area may join the tour at the Oakes Research Test Site south of Oakes.

The public is welcome to attend the tour, which costs $20 per person, and includes transportation, informational materials, meals, refreshments and a one-year subscription to the North Dakota Water magazine.

In addition to the Irrigation tour, the foundation is also hosting the “Managing the Mighty Mouse” tour on Aug. 8 (departing from Minot) and the Missouri River Expedition tour on Aug. 21 (departing from Bismarck).

For more information or to register, contact the North Dakota Water Education Foundation at (701) 223-8332, or e-mail ndwater

users@btinet.net.

Alternative sheep grazing systems workshop slated

Sheep producers will be able to learn about alternative grazing systems at a North Dakota State University Extension Service-sponsored workshop Aug. 2.

The workshop will be from 9 a.m. to noon at AL Ranch near Woodworth. Ranch co-owner Brent Kuss will discuss methods he is trying, including:

The cost of the Cooking With Lamb, Working With Wool and Training a Stock Dog workshops is $25 per person. The cost for the afternoon and evening sessions on Aug. 2 also is $25 per person.

Full registration (both days) if registering by July 26 is $45 per adult plus $25 for each addition adult family member and $10 for each child age 5 to 17. The expo is free for children under age 5.

For more information about the workshops or expo, contact Reid Redden, NDSU Extension sheep specialist, at (701) 231-5597 or reid.redden@ndsu.edu. To register, visit the NDSU Animal Sciences Department website at www.ag.ndsu.edu/ansc/.

NDSU launches workshops focusing on local foods

The North Dakota State University Extension Service is launching a series of workshops to help communities get involved in the local foods movement.

The first workshop, “Building Capacity for Local/Regional Food and Understanding the Industry,” is Aug. 13 at FARRMS in Medina.

Interest in eating locally produced food continues to grow among consumers, restaurants, schools and grocers. The reasons vary, but health, safety, freshness and knowing where one’s food comes from are four key drivers.

From 2007 through 2010, local food sales increased from $1.2 billion to $5 billion nationally. This trend appears to be continuing because more farmers markets open each year and the number of small farms (those less than 100 acres) is expanding.

North Dakota has gained more than nine farmers markets in the last two years.

In a 2011 NDSU symposium that examined scaling up local foods, participants said training to help expand this effort, especially in local areas, was needed.

To register for the workshop, visit http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/smallbusiness. The registration deadline is July 15.

The workshop is free of charge. Participants will receive travel stipends and a small grant to initiate a local foods program in their communities.

For more information, contact Muske at glenn.muske@ndsu.edu or call (701) 328-9718.