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Forum staff reports, Published March 18 2013

Hot topic: Swedish mannequins cause a controversy

A clothing store in Sweden is being hailed by women around the world after a photo of two surprisingly curvy mannequins there were photographed and posted online.

Dressed in skimpy lingerie, the mannequins displayed softer stomachs, fuller thighs and generally more realistic proportions than the traditional department store models. For comparison, most mannequins in the U.S. are between a svelte size 4 or 6-a departure from the average American woman who is a size 14.

On Tuesday, a blogger at I Am Bored posted a photo of the mannequins to Facebook and the response was overwhelming. “It’s about time reality hit...” wrote out of almost 2,500 commentators. “Anybody saying these mannequins encourage obesity or look unhealthy, you have a seriously warped perception of what is healthy. I guarantee the “bigger” mannequin in the front there represents a perfect BMI” wrote another. As of Thursday, the photo had garnered almost 50,000 likes and shared almost 15,000 times. That’s a lot of attention for a hunk of fiber glass and plastic.

As much as the public contests these down-sized mannequins, when designers have attempted to create dolls that reflect real-life proportions they’re met with criticism, even disgust. In late 2012, when a Reddit user posted a photo of an “obese mannequin” in satire, commentary ranged from “Ew, fat people”, “It’s embarrassing how obese America is” and the amusing, “He’s not fat, just big foamed.”

A recent published in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that women’s self esteem takes a nosedive when exposed to models of any size, so maybe there is no easy answer. But as long as mannequins are influencing people to buy fashion, reflecting real-life bodies is a step in the right direction.

Source: Yahoo! Shine