« Continue Browsing

e-mail article Print     e-mail article E-mail

NDSU Extension Service, Published December 29 2011

Barley seed list available from ND Seed Department

FARGO - Growers seeking certified seed to fulfill malt contracts in 2012 are experiencing difficulties sourcing seed this winter.

"The primary reason is that the number of acres of certified seed production in 2011 was the lowest in North Dakota State Seed Department (NDSSD) records," says Steve Sebesta, NDSSD deputy seed commissioner. "Two principal factors contributed to that decrease. First, there was a perception in the industry that there was a reduced demand for certified seed. Secondly, the wet weather throughout the planting season across the state prevented seed growers from getting into their fields in a timely manner and damaged other fields that had been planted."

Staff at NDSSD have met with barley industry representatives and have made attempts to identify sources of seed that are eligible for certification. Last week, the department contacted all certified seed growers who have produced barley seed in any of the last three years to encourage them to notify the NDSSD if they had any seed eligible for certification.

"That effort has yielded several contacts that have seed eligible for certification," Sebesta says. "While the list is not lengthy, it's a start. Our office receives calls daily from seed growers who have barley eligible for certification and producers looking for certified seed."

Most people are seeking Tradition and Lacey barley seed. However, buyers need to be aware that those and most other popular varieties are PVP Title V protected. PVP Title V states that the seed may be sold only as a class of certified seed. Common seeds of Title V varieties are prohibited and would not meet malt contract requirements in some cases.

The "2012 Barley Seed Availability" list contains names of seed producers who have seed available and also names of growers who are looking for seed. NDSSD has posted the list in the "News" section of its website at http://www.ndseed.com. Anyone using the supplemental list should be cautioned that the list is only meant to bring together suppliers and buyers.

It should be noted that this is not the official primary list of available seed.

"Certified seed growers whose fields passed field inspection in 2011 are listed in the "2012 Seed Directory," Sebesta says. "Producers interested in sourcing seed should check this publication first because it is the most comprehensive list of new crop barley seed available. The seed guide, which was distributed last week, also lists certified seed growers."

In addition, all state and federal seed laws, including labeling requirements, must be fulfilled before any seed can be sold.