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John Lamb, Published August 07 2010

Crowd goes from Nashville to Detroit as Kid Rock keeps WE Fest going

DETROIT LAKES, Minn. – Following electrifying sets by Jason Aldean, Blake Shelton and Eric Church is a tough order. Not many in Nashville could’ve topped Friday’s bill at WE Fest.

That’s why the country festival’s organizers looked outside of Nashville and country music altogether for a headliner.

Kid Rock was man enough for the job.

Or more than man.

Rock kicked off his set with “Rock & Roll Jesus” at 10:45 p.m.

If you think that gives the rocker a messiah complex, well, the 40,000 music fans on their feet were ready to follow the charismatic entertainer.

Kid Rock got his start in hip-hop before making it big during the nu metal boom. But his musical roots run deeper as he showed in “Son of Detroit.”

“I like to play Hank Williams records as loud as they will rock,” he sang, or rather, yelled.

Kid Rock got some help from Fargo-raised background singer Shannon Curfman, who can add “dancer” to her already impressive resume.

Jason Aldean fired up the crowd with a 90-minute set of amped-up country.

Guitar-driven tracks like “Johnny Cash” and “Big Green Tractor” had the crowd roaring. The heavy rhythm of “She’s Country” paved the way for Kid Rock’s big beats.

After Church’s electric set, Shelton set the tone for one of country’s biggest parties with his anthem “It’s all About Tonight.”

The singer noted that many looked like they may have had too good a night on Thursday and were fighting hangovers.

“This is clearly not the first day of WE Fest,” he said.

He proposed an antidote for what ailed them – more country music.

“Talk about a bunch of drunk rednecks,” he said looking at the crowd, beer in hand. “Finally a crowd I can relate to.”

Tidbits

  • There was a tribute to Mahnomen Sheriff’s Deputy Chris Dewey on the Jumbotron Friday afternoon. Dewey was shot in the line of duty last year.

    Later there was a tribute to two WE Fest staffers, former partner Terry McCloskey who succumbed to cancer last month. Another man who lines up the vendors was also on hand. He is fighting cancer and said was happy to make the show.

  • Kyle Weets didn’t sing a note, but he got a big round of applause when he proposed to his girlfriend, Amy Amenrud.

    On stage between the sets of Shelton and Aldean, Weets got down on one knee to pop the question.

    “Everything just faded away,” he said when asked if he was nervous about proposing in front of thousands of people. “I didn’t see anyone but her.”

    Backstage a few minutes later, Amenrud said she was still stunned.

    “I can’t feel my legs,” she said.

    The couple, from Evansville, Minn., met two years ago at WE Fest, the first time to the event for either.

  • If this year’s lineup seemed a bit younger than last year, it was. By a bit. The average age of touring performers this year: 34.5, nine years younger than last year’s 43.73.

    The oldest artist last year was Ronnie Dunn of Brooks & Dunn at 56. The youngest was Taylor Swift, then 19. This year, the old-timer was Eddie Montgomery at 46 and the youngest was Cheyenne Kimball of Gloriana at 21.

  • WE Fest organizers said attendance was in line with previous years, estimating attendance was well over 40,000. Tickets for today’s show are still available for $59 at the gate.

  • Readers can reach Forum reporter John Lamb at (701) 241-5533